Hassas esnek Antenli robot böcekler-Researchers have developed a flexible, sensor-laden artificial antenna to help a robotic “bug”


Araştırmacılar karanlıkta veya dar, ulaşılamaz yerlerde kullanılmak üzere yeni bir sensör geliştirdiler.  Bu sensör,  böceklerdeki gibi hassas antenler şeklinde tasarlanmıştır. 

Researchers have developed a flexible, sensor-laden artificial antenna to help a robotic “bug” move and navigate just like the common cockroach. The bug can curry along walls, turn corners, avoid obstacles, and feel its way through the dark. In rescue operations, such robots could be sent to explore collapsed buildings and other situations that could pose hazards or just be inaccessible to humans.

Johns Hopkins researchers have adapted a commercial robot for their experiments with cockroach-inspired technology. Here, the robot uses an earlier version of the antenna to “feel” its way along a wall. (Photo by Will Kirk / Courtesy of Johns Hopkins University)

 

To most of us, cockroaches are a nasty nuisance. But engineers are now using them as role models for designing robots.

Now, mechanical engineers have a new bug-inspired robot device to send into risky rescues like earthquakes.

“The idea is that we want to make robots become more and more capable of going into dangerous environments without a human being there guiding it on every step,” says Noah Cowan, who is a mechanical engineer at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Most robots can’t “see” when lights are dim. But the key to this robot’s success is its cockroach-like antenna that helps it scurry along walls, turn corners, avoid obstacles, and feel its way through the dark. “Our sensor is flexible and reaches out and touches an object, so if there’s clouds or smoke, the sensor doesn’t have a problem, it will still follow along the surface just fine,” Cowan says.

The antenna is attached to a wheeled robot made of a flexible, rubber-like material. It has six embedded sensors. When one of them bumps into an object, it feeds an electrical signal to a tiny computer inside the robot, steering the robot away from or closer to the object.

“I envision not one or two but dozens of robots traveling through a building on their own,” Cowan explains, “rather than one human operator trying to remote control a single robot.”

Scientists are currently working on perfecting their roach-inspired robot before it can be made available to emergency response teams. Researchers are hopeful their roach robot will kick off an invasion of future rescue robots.

27 Ekim, 2008 tarihinde Bilim, Science, Elektrik, Electric, Elektronik,electronic, Teknoloji,technology içinde yayınlandı ve , , , , , , , , , , , , , , olarak etiketlendi. Kalıcı bağlantıyı yer imlerinize ekleyin. Yorum yapın.

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